Friday, August 8, 2014

The Wind Rises: The Re(al)-view

Source: http://moviefail.com/
Caproni: Airplanes are beautiful, cursed dreams, waiting for the sky to swallow them up.
The Wind Rises is not just a brilliant animated film; it has to be one of the finest dramas ever made. And it’s, animation genius, Hayao Miyazaki's final film.

Source: http://owlswellblog.wordpress.com/
Any film made either by Japanese Animation Film Studio, Studio Ghibli or Pixar is a must watch, even the short films! And Hayao Miyazaki, who is a co-founder of Studio Ghibli, is responsible for some of the most fantastic animated films made in the past 25 years. He is responsible for amazing films like My Neighbour Totoro (which was my first Miyazaki film, that I saw at a much younger age, absolutely loved!), PonyoPrincess Mononoke and my personal favourite - the 2002 Academy Award Winning feature - Spirited Away. If you've ever seen any of these films, you would know why it's nearly impossible not to want to see The Wind Rises.
Source: http://comicsworthreading.com/
There's always something unique and brilliant about Studio Ghibli films - the story. It has this Je ne sais quoi feel to it, which you just can't get enough of. The Wind Rises is loosely based on Japanese Aeronautic Engineer, Jiro Horikoshi's life as a designer of air planes during World War 2. The story, though fictionalised, takes us through Jiro's life as a designer of planes and his inspirations - the 'shared dream' with Italian aeronautical engineer Giovanni Caproni was quite captivating. Also the placement of historical events such as the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923, the Great Depression, the Tuberculosis Epidemic and World War 2 were subtle. The depiction of the Kanto earthquake (which was devastating) sneaks up on you and the aftershocks, terrifying.
Source: http://rebloggy.com/
The Wind Rises is a beautiful film in the most literal manner. Caproni's 'shared dreams' with Jiro displayed some beautiful designs of air planes (yes, beautiful, maybe not feasible), adding a touch of fantasy (that is all too familiar with Miyazaki’s films). The depictions of various locations helped set the tone of the film; a personal favourite was the gloomy (and somewhat foggy) Nazi Germany.
Source: http://www.michaelspornanimation.com/
Of all the beautiful designs and captivating scenes, it was the characters that brought the film to its masterpiece level; from Jiro’s rise as a brilliant engineer, to Honjo's realistic views of how things were, to Jiro's romance with Nahoko - which you always knew was going to give you a heartache, the mysterious German, Castorp and the ever colourful Kurokawa. These characters were in perfect synchronisation, something that’s nearly impossible in live-action films.
Source: http://www.theverge.com/
The song playing (Hikōki-gumo by Yumi Arai) during the end credits set the final mood for the film; a song that was written for a friend who passed away. The standout scene has to be where Caproni explains to Jiro the problem with the army - they want everything big (which has an element of truth – see The Aviator).
Source: http://www.thestar.com.my/
The sadness you feel at the end of the film can be likened to the news that Hayao Miyazaki will no longer be making films. I must say a VERY BIG THANK YOU to, perhaps, the greatest animator since Walt Disney.

Opened: July 20, 2013 Runtime: 2 hr. 06 min. Genre: Animation, Drama, Biography Rated: PG

NB: You can enjoy the song below :)